Brainstorming with Potential Ideas

A work from the Out of Hand: Materialising the Digital exhibition showing at the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences was Who This Am 2014 by Kijin Park.

larger.jpgThis 3D printed cup sits on top of 60,871 A4 pages consisting of the binary code which is simply zeros and ones, this code is what was required in order to print this cup. The materials are A4 paper, polyactic acid filament which is the paper cup, along with the sound equipment.

Despite the fact that I don’t aspire to purse 3D printing there are other physical elements of this work that influence me such as the the fact that its an installation, although its fairly simple the theoretical meaning behind it is complex and initiates deep thought, questions and conversation. The element of sound in the piece of the cup psychically   printing added an interesting aesthetic to the work something i’d like to posses when it comes to creating my own. By tapping into multiple senses it promotes greater audience engagement and tends to be more interesting. Ironically for me the use of colour is quite enticing, ironic as it is very simple, neutral and basic but it was still the very first artwork I approached out of the entire exhibition. Something about utilising neutral colours can be very affective, the work that I will be creating doesn’t need to be bold, bright and colourful in order to convey a message or capture attention. I’d also like to touch on the materials, I admire basic materials in installation work due to that fact that it will not distract the audience from the meaning the work is there to portray.

Thinking deeper in regards to the work Id like to create, I definitely see myself making an installation, one that requires human interaction in some form or another. Through utilising photography and film, I can potentially either project an image or recording of human movement onto an object or wall. I could possibly capture peoples reactions to a certain object and then replay that footage with sound and a time delay.

I will continue to research various works, including those displayed in the Out of Hand: Materialising the Digital exhibition and artworks discussed my in classes, this will assist me in gaining insight into various techniques and possible ideas I am willing to explore.

Out of Hand: Materialising the Digital

This week during our tutorial we went to see the Out of Hand: Materialising the Digital exhibition showing at the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, which is on display until the 25th June 2017. The exhibition explores the highly important role of digital material in contemporary art, science, fashion, design and architecture.

The exhibition consists of the work from more than 60 artists, architects and designers globally such as Zaha Hadid, Ron Arad and Barry X Ball as well as works from Australia and the Asia-Pacific and the MAAS collection. The exhibition explores the impact that digital technology has in the creation and design process of works, making us appreciate the several techniques that have been recently discovered giving artists greater opportunity and advancing possibilities and expectations.

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Several works captured my attention in this exhibition, one being Who This Am 2014 by Kijin Park. As mentioned by Craswell the work features a 3D-printed cup sitting on a pallet of 60,871 A4 sheets of paper with a massive amount of numbers consisting of zeros and ones, all these numbers together make up the binary code required to print the cup (Craswell, 2016). There’s also a recording playing from the ceiling which appears to be the sound of the 3D printer creating the cup. The materials the work is made of is A4 paper, polyactic acid filament (paper cup) and sound equipment. I believe this work relates to my artistic practice through installation and the use of 3D printing.

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This work by XYZ Workshop (Kae Woei Lim and Elena Low) is called inBloom Dress, 2014, it is one of the first fully 3D-printed dresses in the world and the first in Australia. The code for the dress is open-source and available for anyone to download. The designers utilised the Ultimaker kit that you build from scratch, they chose this printer for their work to challenge the boundaries of fashion and because it is all completely opened sourced.

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This is the work i’ve decided to study for my second assignment, its called Faces used for Paranorman film 2012 created by LAIKA in the United States. LAIKA became the first company to utilise 3D printing with traditional replacement animation techniques. Replacement animation is used in stop-motion, parts of a characters face or body are replaced by different parts to create the illusion of some form of movement. During the production of Paranorman 40,000 face parts were created.

As mentioned by Sciretta, most films are shot within only a matter of months, however this is not the case with animation as it is a much longer process (Sciretta, 2012). The creation of Paranorman began in 2010 and was only completed two years later in 2012 with 350 people working on the film (Sciretta, 2012). Travis Knight says that LAIKA is “the fusion of handcraft and technology” (Sciretta, 2012). LAIKA aims to produce handcrafted films, enhanced with the latest technologies such as 3D printing.

Overall, the exhibition displayed a variety of very different objects, all utilising modern day digital materials in order to create unique, inspiring and entertaining works of art.

 

Reference:

Craswell, P 2016, Review: Out of Hand Exhibition, The Design Writer. Think about it., viewed 29th March 2017, <http://thedesignwriter.com.au/review-out-of-hand-exhibition/#more-1907&gt;

Sciretta, P 2012, How Laika Used 3D Color Printers To Create The Stop-Motion Animated Movie ‘Paranorman’ and 50 Other Things We Learned On The Set, Film: Blogging the Reel World, viewed 29th March 2017, <http://www.slashfilm.com/laika-3d-color-printers-create-stopmotion-animated-movie-paranorman-50-learned-set/&gt;

Future Careers

Today in my MEDA tutorial we discussed our future in the workforce, what we want to do and how we are going to get there. It has been made quite evident of the challenges media artists face when it comes to trying to make money pursuing their passions however, this doesn’t mean it is impossible.

In class we were given time to search for jobs and internships on the UOW site, seek, NSW Government etc. I decided to mainly stick with NSW Government (http://iworkfor.nsw.gov.au) who displayed a number of potential jobs such as being a communication director/manager, social media manager, media manger and the list goes on. But there were a few common characteristics between them, all were very well paid being 100K+ annually nonetheless, to qualify for consideration you must have years of superior experience within the industry, which I don’t. So I decided to look into internships, which seemed fairly difficult to locate. It seems that the only way in which you’ll ever gain suitable employment in this competitive industry is if you do years of free labour in order to create an appropriate resume with the hope that employers may consider you.

On another note, I did come up with another realistic job, which I’ve had my mind on for a few years, high school visual art teaching which is something I too have always been passionate about and can see myself pursuing. Usually when these particular jobs open up they are advertised on the NSW Government site as well, but they don’t come around very often. In order to be a high school teacher I must go on to complete a masters of secondary education majoring in visual art.

In the second part of class we spoke about who our mentors and referees would be as well as our portfolios. My high school’s head art teacher was my photography and digital imaging teacher through out my years in school, we created a great working relationship and she taught me everything I know. We still keep in contact about the work I’m creating and I know she would vouch for me as my referee. The same applies to my principal and my previous visual art teacher who is now retired but is a well-known local art figure.

As for my portfolio, my preferred medium is photography so I have 3 portfolios one is my website and the other two are printed into a professional journal, I also have an instagram (username: isabelleimages).

There are many potential avenues in which I can take; all that is needed is determination and passion. Being in the last year of this degree it is essential to start looking into possible careers in which I hope to part take in next year.

 

 

 

Gregory Crewdson

Gregory Crewdson is an American photographer best known for staging cinematic scenes of suburbia to dramatic effect. Crewdson works within a photographic tradition that combines the style of William Eggleston and Walker Evans with the same vision as filmmakers such as Stephen Spielberg and David Lynch (White Cube, 2017). The artist has heavily influenced me in the making of my own works and has always created pieces in which I continuously refer back to and admire.

Gregory Crewdson was born in 1962 in Brooklyn, NY. He is a graduate of SUNY Purchase and the Yale School of Art, where he is now Director of Graduate Studies in Photography (Gagosian, 2017). The photographers career has been going on for over 30 years. His work has been exhibited all over the world including in the United States and Europe and is included in many public collections, such as the Museum of Modern Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Brooklyn Museum, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Smithsonian American Art Museum (Gagosian, 2017).

One of Gregory Crewdson most well known art works ‘Beneath the Roses’ is a theatrical series with yet intensely real panoramic images, Crewdson explores the recesses of the American psyche and the disturbing dramas at play within suburban environments (White Cube, 2017). The photographs portray emotionally charged moments of seemingly ordinary individuals caught in ambiguous and often disturbing circumstances. So big in size yet so detailed, these visually aesthetic photographs blur the differences between cinema and photography, reality and fantasy, and the past and present.

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Crewdson shot this series with an 8×10 film camera, the series was the last he shot with film before moving to digital as he felt digital would give him more opportunity. He worked very closely with his Director of Photography whom he had worked with for years prior, their main focus is the light, Crewdson believes its the most important element of the entire enterprise and he needs to work with someone that feels the same way (Weingart, 2017). The artist utilises Espon in order to print his works, he likes to print them on a very large scale and this way the audience is able to analyse the image and see it for its detailed beauty.

Masses amount of prep go into every single  image of Crewdsons work. To shoot beneath the Roses, Crewdson shut down public streets, used rainmaking machines to produce downpours and even began a raging house fire. He uses Hollywood production style techniques to create what he calls “in-between moments” of momentous events (Fletcher, 2008). His pictures set the stage for a story, but the viewer has to seek the conclusion themselves, which is generally very open ended.

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Reference:

Gagosian, 2017, Gregory Crewdson Bibiography, Gagosian, viewed 20th March 2017, <http://www.gagosian.com/artists/gregory-crewdson&gt;

K, Fletcher 2008, Gregory Crewdon’s Epic Effects, Smithsonian, viewed 20 March, <http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/gregory-crewdsons-epic-effects-48744461/&gt;

White Cube, 2017, Gregory Crewdson, Beneath the Roses, viewed 20 March 2017, <http://whitecube.com/exhibitions/gregory_crewdson_beneath_the_roses_hoxton_square_2005/&gt;

K, Weingart, Petapixel, An interview with Gregory Crewdson, viewed 20 March 2017, <https://petapixel.com/2016/05/18/interview-gregory-crewdson/&gt;

White Cube, 2017, Gregory Crewdson, Beneath the Roses, viewed 20 March 2017, <http://whitecube.com/exhibitions/gregory_crewdson_beneath_the_roses_hoxton_square_2005/&gt;

Research Processes

Being a student interested in pursing a career in the photographic field Im constantly researching artists work in order to appropriate and gain my own ideas from theirs. Three artists that interest me the most is Gregory Crewdson, Cindy Sherman and Marian Drew. The three heavily utilise artificial light in order to convey a story and have a very unique way of portraying their idea.

One of Gregory Crewdson most famous photographic production ‘Beneath the Roses’ is a theatrical series with yet intensely real panoramic images, Crewdson explores the recesses of the American psyche and the disturbing dramas at play within suburban environments (White Cube, 2017). The photographs portray emotionally charged moments of seemingly ordinary individuals caught in ambiguous and often disturbing circumstances. So big in size yet so detailed, these visually aesthetic photographs blur the differences between cinema and photography, reality and fantasy, and the past and present.

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Crewdson shot this series with an 8×10 film camera, this series was the last he shot with film before moving to digital as he felt it restricted him. He worked very closely with his Director of Photography whom he has worked with in previous series, his main focus is the light, Crewdson says its the most important thing about the entire enterprise (Weingart, 2017). The artist utilises Espon in order to print his works, he likes to print them on a very large scale and this way the audience is able to analyse the image and see it for its detailed beauty.

The American feminist artist Cindy Sherman 1954 is famous for the Untitled Film Stills series (1977-1980) that consist of black and white images of the artist posing in different stereotypical female roles. She used vintage clothing, wigs and makeup to create the various looks which she then photographed in alone, unguarded moments of reflection, undress, or in conversation with somebody outside of the frame (Tate, 2017). The photographs are set in various locations including her loft apartment and outside in urban and rural landscapes.

She took many of the pictures herself using a extended shutter release, the images taken outdoors, required a second person to take the photograph, she would ask her partner, friends and family to help her with this (Tate, 2017). Sherman’s father took #48, in which she appears as a vulnerable young woman waiting with a suitcase at the side of a darkening country road.

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Containing 69 black and white images taken with a film camera, 8.5×11 inches in size, with no titles or captions, the “Untitled Film Stills” became Sherman’s most famous work. There is no single character in the stills nor is there a common narrative. Instead, there is a collection of personas, each created as a function of framing, lighting, distance, and camera angle to reference in a confronting way the stereotypical woman and how they’re displayed in the B-grade films of the 1950’s (Schweitzer, 2014).

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Marian Drew is a photographer best known for her series ‘Australiana’, the artist creates still life memento mori’s influenced by both Vanitas and  18th century European still life painting (Light journeys, 2015). Each still life depicts an Australian native animal placed on a table with linen and other domestic objects such as fine china, candles, fruit and vegetables. Each image has been beautifully lit, depicting the various settings through light and shadow, carefully composing each of the objects and native animals to create an uneasy stillness.

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Drew photographs her still life images in a dark studio using long exposure and a torch light to paint the areas of light into the image. The photographs are exposed onto medium format film, requiring experiementation and bracketin,g as Marian Drew does not see the final effect of this ‘painting with light’ until after the film has been developed.

Overall, researching artists like these that obtain the same photographic style as myself gives me knowledge on their material and conceptual practice, which influences and assists me during the brain storming process when creating my own artworks.

Reference:

White Cube, 2017, Gregory Crewdson, Beneath the Roses, viewed 6 March 2017, <http://whitecube.com/exhibitions/gregory_crewdson_beneath_the_roses_hoxton_square_2005/&gt;

K, Weingart, Petapixel, An interview with Gregory Crewdson, viewed 6 March 2017, <https://petapixel.com/2016/05/18/interview-gregory-crewdson/&gt;

Tate, 2017, Tate, Cindy Sherman, viewed 6 March 2017, <http://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/sherman-untitled-film-still-48-p11518&gt;

LARB, 2017, Cindy Shermans ‘Unitled Film’ Stills, Los Angeles Review of Books, viewed 6 March 2017, <https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/cindy-shermans-untitled-film-stills/&gt;

Light Journeys, 2017, Marian Drew, Light Journeys, viewed 6 March 2017, <http://lightjourneys.org.au/artists/marian-drew/&gt;

 

What’s your Creative Field?

Personally, I see myself working within a creative field engaging with photography and film making utilising my strong interest for media arts to pursue this passion. Specifically I seem to be most attracted to art direction, fashion photography, advertising, social media, editing, commercial photography, or being the gaffer of a production. I will mostly focus on art direction this semester as it incorporates many of these mediums into one.

An art director typically oversees the work of other designers and artists who produce images for television, film, live performances, advertisements, or video games (Sokanu, 2017). They determine the overall style or tone desired for each project and articulate their vision to artists who submit images, such as illustrations, graphics, photographs, charts and graphs, or stage and movie sets.

An art director will typically do the following:

  • Determine how best to represent a concept visually
  • Determine which photographs, art, or other design elements to use
  • Develop the overall look or style of a publication, advertising campaign, or theater, television, or film set
  • Supervise design staff
  • Review and approve designs, artwork, photography, and graphics developed by staff members
  • Talk to clients to develop an artistic approach and style
  • Coordinate activities with other artistic or creative departments
  • Develop detailed budgets and timelines

I have made various films and photographic works which have given me insight into what in particular interests me and the process on how these final works are created.

This here is one of my photographic series called ‘Gravity Disrupted – Immersion’. It explores the feeling one can only endure whilst being in water, the feeling of being completely immersed and dislocated from reality.

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In order to create this series, I needed to first get a team of models together from there I wrote a list of the equipment needed, the location of where this series will be shot and drew sketches of the poses I wanted to models to do. After all this was sorted I was ready to go, I just needed to determine exactly what weather was required for me to gain the perfect light in my images as my intention was only to use natural light, and that way I’d gain the rays of sun glistening through the surface of the water and off the models skin.

On the day of the shoot I directed the models on how/where to pose while actually taking the photos at the same time. There were many actions taken to create this piece, it was the first major series I had created and therefore I did learn a lot, mostly through trial and error discovering what did and didn’t work. You can do hours upon hours of planning prior but in my experience, majority of the time it will never go the way it was planned so you need to go into the shoot with an open mind and plenty of ideas.

The actions taken that interested me most was taking the photographs, directing the models and editing the series.  I like to be hands on and have control over how the photographs will turn out. I believe the skills needed to execute these actions successfully is knowledge and experience with cameras, being able to effectively communicate with others and having superior skills and practice with photo editing programs.

Reference:

Sokanu, 2017, What is an Art Director?, What does an Art Director do?, viewed 28 February 2017,< https://www.sokanu.com/careers/art-director/&gt;